Folksy Ltd

Which came first?

The chicken or the egg?

Thought I’d get us on a great debate. x :laughing:

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In my house the chickens came first :smiley:

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The rooster!

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That’s what I think too Rachel. x @Glehcar

Warning-nerdy reply coming. The egg. The primeval ancestors of the chicken (some of whom were certainly dinosaurs) and indeed their ancestors themselves, all laid eggs. It was the creature that hatched from the egg that changed most markedly over time (although the eggs did acquire hard shells, a less oblong and more egg like shape, etc, etc.)

Sorry! I did warn you it was a nerdy reply :wink:

Love Sam x

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lol Samantha! x :laughing: @SamanthaStanley

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I am still right at my house we bought the chickens then they laid the eggs :smiley: :smiley: :smiley: :smiley:

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lol. x @Glehcar :grin:

More nerdy reply…

Didn’t God create animals that live in water and all winged animals (hence chickens) on the 5th day?? :astonished: This was surely before dinosaurs, right? So chickens came first…

More nerdy reply is required…

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Here it is then!

What is it about the universe, or indeed the many universes that may exist floating in their own bubbles outside of this one, that requires an intelligent design? The more elegant theory is surely that the Universe came into being on its own, not requiring a “Creator” or any intelligent design theory to do so.

Therefore the process of the formation of plasma, matter, stars and galaxies, planets, amino acids, DNA and organisms clearly will produce an egg before it produces a chicken to hatch out of one. :smirk:

Love Sam x

p.s. (the smirky face is intended in a purely ironic sense, and is in no way meant to offend anyone with a deeply held religious belief-like some of my close family, for instance :wink:)

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Samantha @SamanthaStanley you’re hilarious but you have made a good point lol. x :laughing:

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I’ll know the answer tomorrow depending on who turns up first - the nice man from waitrose with the chicken or the neighbour with eggs.
My question is what did we domesticate to get chickens? We still have wild boar/ dogs / cats etc (and I’m not talking feral ones here but the ancestor species) there are even the species that things like pigeons were bred from but where is the wild chicken? Ditto cows - I don’t think we went from Bison to friesan somehow. Or did they just prove too tasty?
Finally why does the easter bunny deliver (chocolate) eggs? Surely as a rabbit it should deliver carrots? I mean when the easter goalie stood in for the easter bunny (who was recovering from a RTA, my parents are a bit twisted) he delivered chocolate footballs. I know its some sort of Christian/ Pagan festival mash up but they could at least make it sensible.
Can you tell that my brain has had far to long thinking up tags?
Right - must get back to it.
Sasha

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But there have to be organisms / animals / people to produce that egg first…hhhmmm…that’s never ending ha ha

I’m not deeply religious (so I’m not offended at all)…but I do have a lot of faith in Google for difficult and complicated topics and answers :stuck_out_tongue:

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This one is easy, Sasha!

The cow was domesticated from the (now extinct) european Aurochs, which was an extremely scary wild cow. The bull that is being leapt over in the fresco at Knossos is probably a cross between an early domesticated cow and an Aurochs bull. Aurochs can also be seen depicted in cave paintings in France and Spain.

Chickens are domesticated from the Indian Jungle fowl and have changed very little from the wild form except in terms of size and plumage. I’m happy to say that the Indian jungle fowl is very much with us, still trotting around at the feet of the Himalayas.

The easter bunny is a Hare-sacred to the Saxon fertility goddess Eastre and the Saxons were the people who first introduced hares to this country, so they are in fact a non-native species (as are rabbits who were introduced by the Normans). The eggs were lapwing eggs, which were traditionally collected by children from the marshes in March or April when the lapwing starts to nest. This must have been quite a dangerous job and I can’t imagine sending my little darlings to do it! It was a necessary task, however, because lapwing eggs are one of the first sources of wild food available in Europe after the notorious “hunger gap” of February and March, where often no fresh eggs, meat or vegetables were available.

The Christians found that if people were allowed to keep some of their old traditions, they didn’t mind too much if they lost the gods associated with them, so Christian festivals, especially Christmas have many aspects of the old pagan rites attached to their folklore, without any convincing reason as to why this should be so (despite the best efforts of Victorian theologians to justify them).

Hope this inspires your tagging :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:

Love Sam x

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Google is an excellent source of information :wink:

Thanks Kelly!

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I have a pigeon in my garden, I call him Billy No Mates, because he is always on his own, I doubt he ever came from an egg, he just is. He’s very intelligent, so could be the reincarnation of Charles Darwin or someone of that ilk, but that’s another subject. Marg.

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Well the eggs came after the chickens in our vicinity, the chicken went under the hedge and laid around 20 eggs and 15 of them hatched- now there are 15 chickteens (about 4 months old but they act like teenagers) and they all think I’m their mum and come running towards me when they see me out with my poor drooling dog, who’s itching too eat them :dog:

I wouldn’t mind but they don’t even belong to us, they belong to next door!

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Love the word ‘chickteens’ :smile:

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lol Suzanne. x @WashedandFound

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