Folksy Ltd

Can we have more of these please Folksy?

Hi Camilla @folksycontent :wave:

Will you be doing any more of these product listing review blog posts?

https://blog.folksy.com/2019/05/23/product-listing-review-2-knitted-cushion

I found the three you did very helpful and would love to see more please :smiling_face_with_three_hearts:

Katrina

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I find these really useful too, and would love to see more.

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I’ll third that, they really were very useful!

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I’ll see what we can do! Is there anything in particular you’d like us to look at or cover?

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@folksycontent From my point of view, yes there is! A lot of my stuff is very difficult to categorise, and the drawback to that is that a search would not throw it up. I’m talking about my Kindred collection, which is non functional, isn’t really sculpture, doesn’t really fit into art either, ‘ornament’ seems rather downmarket, it’s not really figurative ceramics because it’s abstract, so what would be a really effective title and how should I tag it? The drawback to online selling is that people need to know beforehand what they would like to see and thus know what to put in their search, if your stuff doesn’t fit into an accepted description of what it is, then you lose out. I tend to end up putting tags that might appeal to someone who is in fact looking for something else, but might like my work - such as art, sculpture, abstract etc but I don’t know whether this works or not… Could we have some guidance for people who make things that don’t fit neatly into a category?

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@JudyAdams I don’t think “art” is a tag that is aimed at someone looking for something else, I’ve just had a look at your kindred items and if I were looking for something like that then “art” and “abstract sculpture” are exactly what I’d be searching!

@konyskiw Thanks Kim. It’s really helpful to get advice. I am trying different Folksy categories for different Kindred pieces at the moment and monitoring what category works best via looking at my stats and using Google analytics. I have also changed all titles to incorporate words like ‘art’ etc to see if that makes a difference. Kindred sell well through physical galleries, though not particularly well through Folksy, where my vases do better, perhaps because they are more readily searchable as defined utilitarian ceramics. Thank you for your feedback.

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@JudyAdams I think items with a use are always going to be easier to sell, and it’s something I remember my old art teacher getting frustrated with at school too. He just wanted to make some nice ceramic wall pieces, but all people ever wanted to buy was mugs, mugs and more mugs.
I expect in galleries you get people who are purely looking for art/sculpture without the need for any use from the item, but as you say, here people are probably not so sure what they’re looking for, and if they’re looking for a gift then then they probably feel more confident selecting something with a use as they know the recipient also likes flowers or drinking tea or whatever.

They might be a harder sale to get but they are beautiful items! The patterns on them remind me a bit of suprematism and constructivism, but again I don’t think they’re things buyers are really going to be searching. I would definitely use tags that target art/sculpture buyers, but I think you’re right, I feel like there must be an angle that’s missing too! I’m just not sure what (and don’t forget multi word tags are also good to use, so you can have things like “contemporary sculpture”, “modern art” if you need more).

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@konyskiw I agree with your thinking, and constructivism is definitely an influence on the designs. I spend a lot of time looking at 1930s, 40s, 50s art, architecture and textiles. Thanks for your comment about multi word tags - I have tried some phrases on some pieces, but am never sure whether a searcher would have to put in the whole phrase to get a result, and thus whether by putting ‘modern art’ I would be excluding someone who just put in ‘modern’. I wonder whether a search facility like ‘surprise me’ (which some websites do) offering a random selection of items, or ‘if you liked this, maybe you would like these’ or ‘people who searched for this also searched for these’ facility, but I’m not sure how possible that would be on Folksy. Thank you for your advice which is much appreciated!

Hi Camiila,

I’ve found a great deal of value from all three so don’t have any preference as to what items are looked at :+1:

Cheers,

Katrina

@JudyAdams It should be that if your tag matches exactly what they’re searching, you’re likely to show higher, so if they search “modern art” and you have that as a tag, you’re nearer the front of the results. If you have all the words but it’s not as exact, like they search “modern art” and you have “modern” and “art” separately, or they search “modern” and you have “modern art”, you should still be included in the results, but might be a little further back.
It’s the tricky thing of trying to decide which is the term they’re likely to search by. I have a few terms I can put on almost all of my items, so I try to mix it up so some will have “original art” and “acrylic painting”, and others will have “acrylic art” and “original painting”, and then others might be all separate, then whichever people are searching by, I hopefully have some that are an exact match.

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